Oexone’s Local & International Trade For Farmers

Oexone’s Local & International Trade For Farmers – Imagine a platform where farmers can upload and list the products they have, take orders from potential customers, and get payments sent directly to their bank accounts from buyers around the world?

You don’t have to stretch your imagination too far as such a platform exists and the mastermind is a Jamaican. It was launched in Kingston on July 15. The Oexone platform facilitates Diaspora trade, commerce, and investment opportunities.

It was established as a non-denominational, non-biased regional platform for trade, investments, marketing, value chain capacity building, and payment services to handle local and cross border import and export transactions. It’s the one economic exchange for the prosperity of all.

Robert Kibo Thompson is the founder and CEO of Oex One Holdings. He spoke to us about the challenges and difficulties he faced as an exporter just to get certain information which led him to create the global trade platform – a plan in the making for a decade.

PART ONE

The information provided through this new platform will give local farmers a good idea of the crops that are in demand globally. For example, Thompson says the world can’t get enough of Jamaica’s yellow yam.

Farmers wanting to connect to this platform can visit www.oexmarkets.com or www.oexone.com The impact of the global pandemic on the local economy has once again put the importance of the agriculture sector front and centre.

With 230 thousand farmers and some 20 thousand fisherfolk the livelihood of hundreds of thousands of families and an entire country depend on not just the survival but the forward movement of the industry. Speaking at a webinar hosted by Jamaica promotions last month state minister in the Ministry of Industry Commerce Agriculture and Fisheries Floyd Green was optimistic that the sector was on a growth path.

He reflected that the strategies implemented to assist farmers at the start of the pandemic by purchasing excess produce were successful.

PART TWO

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